Header image
Enter a name
Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Kogotus (Perlodidae) Stonefly Nymph from Mystery Creek #199 in Washington
This one pretty clearly keys to Kogotus, but it also looks fairly different from specimens I caught in the same creek about a month later in the year. With only one species of the genus known in Washington, I'm not sure about the answer to this ID.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Higherroad has attached this picture to aid in identification. The message is below.
Higherroad
Posts: 5
Higherroad on May 5, 2014May 5th, 2014, 2:46 pm EDT
I hope to ID this nymph. I believe it's Maccaffertium Ithaca Light Cahill. The size was about a #16. Photographed in April in SE USA.
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on May 5, 2014May 5th, 2014, 3:58 pm EDT
Hi Higherroad,

Welcome to the forum. That is a nymph from an intirely different family. It is an ephemerellid, probably in the genus Ephemerella.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Higherroad
Posts: 5
Higherroad on May 5, 2014May 5th, 2014, 4:39 pm EDT
Then a Hendrickson or Sulphur perhaps? I've never seen sulphurs on this stream though.
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on May 5, 2014May 5th, 2014, 5:14 pm EDT
It is absolutely not a Hendrickson. If you Google "Hendrickson nymph images" or "Ephemerella subvaria images" you will get a hit with tons of high quality pictures of the insect in question.

Here is a link that shows color variations among two nymphs of the same genus. The light colored nymph of dorothea does resemble your nymph picture. However I'm not a bug guy, just an avid fly fisher, so I don't differentiate very astutely about how many tails or how their sex organs look under a microscope because the trout don't really care.

http://bugguide.net/node/view/882430/bgpage
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on May 6, 2014May 6th, 2014, 2:52 pm EDT
I think you're on the right track, Mack. Nice explanation about the synonymy.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on May 6, 2014May 6th, 2014, 8:47 pm EDT
Yeah, I was thinking about the possibility of the carolina form since synonymized with serrata. The prominent tubercles on the abdominal segs (particularly the ninth) and southern location got me to speculate, but the more I thought about it the more the idea seemed unlikely.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on May 7, 2014May 7th, 2014, 5:59 am EDT
This isn't E. dorothea dorothea though. That species doesn't have tubercles projecting beyond the posterior edges of the abdominal segments.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Crepuscular
Crepuscular's profile picture
Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on May 7, 2014May 7th, 2014, 5:42 pm EDT
I love these Ephemerellid threads!
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on May 7, 2014May 7th, 2014, 7:00 pm EDT
Me too!

BTW, it is a Sulfur Higherroad. If no other reason than it happens to be sulfur colored. ;) I can't imagine the dun being any other color from this nymph. The Sulfurs up in Spence's country are green (remember that one you posted a few years back that fooled me?). These ephemerellids are all over the color wheel, even in the same species.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman

Quick Reply

Related Discussions

Topic
Replies
Last Reply
2
May 28, 2009
by GONZO
1
Jun 27, 2010
by Oldredbarn
0
Jul 24, 2007
by Wbranch
Troutnut.com is copyright © 2004-2024 (email Jason). privacy policy