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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Ephemerella mucronata (Ephemerellidae) Mayfly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
This is an interesting one. Following the keys in Merritt R.W., Cummins, K.W., and Berg, M.B. (2019) and Jacobus et al. (2014), it keys clearly to Ephemerella. Jacobus et al provide a key to species, but some of the characteristics are tricky to interpret without illustrations. If I didn't make any mistakes, this one keys to Ephemerella mucronata, which has not previously been reported any closer to here than Montana and Alberta. The main character seems to fit well: "Abdominal terga with prominent, paired, subparallel, spiculate ridges." Several illustrations or descriptions of this holarctic species from the US and Europe seem to match, including the body length, tarsal claws and denticles, labial palp, and gill shapes. These sources include including Richard Allen's original description of this species in North America under the now-defunct name E. moffatae in Allen RK (1977) and the figures in this description of the species in Italy.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Bowmandjk
erie,penna

Posts: 16
Bowmandjk on Jun 14, 2007June 14th, 2007, 9:07 am EDT
i hear on the salmon river in new york that they are using a florecent fly called the ampfly i was wondering how they would work on lake erie steelheads if anyone has knowledge of this fly and how to tie it or a photo i would sure like to give it a try thanks dave kensinger dsdreamteam@verizon.net a day on the water is priceless good fishing
Shawnny3
Moderator
Pleasant Gap, PA

Posts: 1197
Shawnny3 on Jun 14, 2007June 14th, 2007, 2:29 pm EDT
OK, this is the third thread in a week about glow-in-the-dark flies. Did World War III already happen and I just missed the news? Or are all you PA boys just used to fishing off Three Mile Island?

Sorry, Bowmandjk, for the sarcasm - you don't deserve it (though Louis does for starting all this nonsense). I have heard of fluorescent flies doing well up there, although I can't say I've never fished them myself. I seem to remember a popular one that looked like a big stonefly nymph with a fluorescent green body and black hackle and wingcase, but my memory is pretty poor. I should really just shut up and let more knowledgable voices guide you...

-Shawn
Jewelry-Quality Artistic Salmon Flies, by Shawn Davis
www.davisflydesigns.com

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