Header image
Enter a name
Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Sweltsa (Chloroperlidae) (Sallfly) Stonefly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
This species was fairly abundant in a February sample of the upper Yakima.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Dorsal view of a Male Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Nymph from the Bois Brule River in Wisconsin
This male nymph is probably in its final instar. The wing pads are extremely black and the large turbinate eyes are very apparent inside the nymph's head.
DarkDun
Posts: 16
DarkDun on Jan 30, 2007January 30th, 2007, 5:24 pm EST
I see the grayish tint as more of a Salmon tint. I would tie up some variations and test them. I tie all my nymphs with a variegated coloration rather than a blend. This works on most flies and I try to match the tones to the segment(band)of the natural as you sugested. I have had much success with this approach.
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Mar 19, 2008March 19th, 2008, 1:58 pm EDT
I'm back to wondering about baetis nymphs as I begin to tie them again. Does anyone have a favorite dubbing color for PA spring creeks? I'm going to try some spectrumized dubbings, and perhaps bands as DarkDun and I had been discussing. I think I'll stick with gold wire as the spaces between the segments appear lighter. I may use poly yarn for wingcases, or herl as Gary Borger recommends.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
LittleJ
Hollidaysburg Pa

Posts: 251
LittleJ on Mar 20, 2008March 20th, 2008, 7:11 am EDT
mottled turkey quill. IT is already banded for you.
jeff
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Mar 20, 2008March 20th, 2008, 11:27 am EDT
Jeff, do you tie it as a wrapped herl nymph, like a pheasant tail, or like a Skip's Nymph, with the herl as overback? I've also been thinking of dying some Golden Pheasant tail olive. I just dyed a batch of Pheasant Tail to try some Skip's Leadbelly Nymphs. or some Olive PT's.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
LittleJ
Hollidaysburg Pa

Posts: 251
LittleJ on Mar 20, 2008March 20th, 2008, 1:56 pm EDT
I tie it as a wrapped herl nymph. I use it for several nymphs I just change the body shape.
jeff
Parker
Posts: 1
Parker on Jul 18, 2009July 18th, 2009, 7:30 am EDT
How you "see" the colour on your computer monitor depends on may things and may have little to do with original colour.

For instance, yor monitor has to be profiled correctly. If you see salmon, you may have a red tint.

Also, the camera setting and profile matter, as well as any adjustments made to the photograph.

In addition the colour of light the insect was photographed in will make a difference.

Eat. Breathe. Fish.
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jul 18, 2009July 18th, 2009, 8:01 am EDT
Good point, Parker. Thanks.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Lastchance
Portage, PA

Posts: 437
Lastchance on Jul 18, 2009July 18th, 2009, 12:35 pm EDT
When I tie my nymphs I always dunk them in a cup of water to see what the color looks like when wet. Water does change the color intensity.

Mottled turkey quill is a good baetis material.

Bruce
Shawnny3
Moderator
Pleasant Gap, PA

Posts: 1197
Shawnny3 on Jul 18, 2009July 18th, 2009, 2:21 pm EDT
What Bruce says is especially important because different types of materials darken differently in water. My experience is that natural materials darken much more than synthetics do.

-Shawn
Jewelry-Quality Artistic Salmon Flies, by Shawn Davis
www.davisflydesigns.com

Quick Reply

Related Discussions

Topic
Replies
Last Reply
4
Aug 26, 2008
by Taxon
11
Jan 28, 2019
by Iasgair
4
Mar 19, 2019
by Jmd123
20
Feb 9, 2011
by Oldredbarn
4
Feb 26, 2017
by PaulRoberts
Troutnut.com is copyright © 2004-2024 (email Jason). privacy policy