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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Glossosoma (Glossosomatidae) (Little Brown Short-horned Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
I caught this tiny larva without a case, but it seems to key pretty clearly to to Glossosomatidae. From there, the lack of sclerites on the mesonotum points to either Glossosoma or Anagapetus. Although it's difficult to see in a 2D image from the microscope, it's pretty clear in the live 3D view that the pronotum is only excised about 1/3 of its length to accommodate the forecoxa, not 2/3, which points to Glossosoma at Couplet 5 of the Key to Genera of Glossosomatidae Larvae.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Jmd123 has attached these 4 pictures. The message is below.
Lethocerus sp. (Hemiptera: Belostomatidae)
Good thing they don't get any bigger!
Jmd123
Jmd123's profile picture
Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Nov 2, 2011November 2nd, 2011, 8:12 am EDT
Yesterday I checked out another lake stocked with trout that is open all year long. I didn't catch anything and in fact saw no fish rising or anything, but it was a really beautiful place so I couldn't resist taking a few pictures. Then, while walking along the shoreline to stretch my legs, I saw this Lethocerus sp. - giant water bug - swimming along in the shallows. This thing actually came at my boot!

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Nov 2, 2011November 2nd, 2011, 9:44 am EDT
Jonathon - Ahh... The ol' Toe Biters.

Go to Taxon's forum and check out the few he's got there. There's one that has an extreme close-up with his microscope of the biting parts. Or should I say skewering parts?

Kurt
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Jmd123
Jmd123's profile picture
Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Nov 2, 2011November 2nd, 2011, 10:48 am EDT
Trust me, I knew better than to pick the darned thing up...I collected a specimen once and they have the equivalent of probably a 16-guage needle for a mouth. Plus, there is actually supposed to be some venom involved...

Once upon a time at the University of Michigan Biological Station (a.k.a. Bug Camp), I did pick up a Ranatra sp. "water scorpion" (Hemiptera: Nepidae) without getting poked somehow. I did not try to restrain said bug, just lifted it in a handful of water. It eventually flew away, leaving me unharmed.

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Nov 2, 2011November 2nd, 2011, 12:39 pm EDT
Jonathon -

:)
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman

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