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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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FISHN50 has attached these 2 pictures to aid in identification. The message is below.
FISHN50
FISHN50's profile picture
Metuchen NJ

Posts: 5
FISHN50 on Aug 24, 2011August 24th, 2011, 12:38 pm EDT
Please Id these. I'm doing my first ever (for me) stream study & have never ran into these before
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Aug 24, 2011August 24th, 2011, 4:23 pm EDT
Hi fishn50,

Did you get the first one from the water? The bottom one is a pupating caddis larvae. Probably a rhyacophilid from the looks of it.

Regards,

Kurt
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
FISHN50
FISHN50's profile picture
Metuchen NJ

Posts: 5
FISHN50 on Aug 24, 2011August 24th, 2011, 5:04 pm EDT
Hi Entoman

Thanks for the quick reply. The first one also came out of the water. It was collected in the D net. like I said I never ran into either one of those before. I assumed the second one was a "green Rockworm" pupa case because we picked up quite a few larva,. The first one is one of 4 we picked up in the sampling

Thank's
Neil
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Aug 24, 2011August 24th, 2011, 10:59 pm EDT
Neil-

I believe your 1st photo is of a millipede. They are sightless, and are apparently not particularly deterred by a stream which intersects their path. Some may also be semi-aquatic.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Aug 24, 2011August 24th, 2011, 11:49 pm EDT
Your welcome.

As to the two critters in the top photo - The big multi-legged one looks like some sort of millipede or centipede to me. I'm not up on many of the land based invertebrates and can't tell you what it is or really offer in explanation as to how it got into the water other than bad luck.:)

The little guy in the lower left though I think I can help with. It looks to be a member of the Philopotamidae family of finger net spinning caddisflys. Its long ovoid head makes me think Dolophilodes distincta or Winter Caddis. Despite its name this species can have summer emergences, but this particular specimen looks to be a part of the group that emerges from November to as late as February. A curious thing about them is the winter brood females have dwarfed wings and don't fly.

Enlarging the photo shows a dark area it the anterior margin that could be the prominent notch indicative of the Chimarra genus (another philopotamid), but the heads of Chimarra are usually less ovoid and thicker. They are also often noticeably shorter from the eyes to the posterior margin and as wide or wider than the pronotum at their joining.

Regards,

Kurt
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Oldredbarn
Oldredbarn's profile picture
Novi, MI

Posts: 2600
Oldredbarn on Aug 25, 2011August 25th, 2011, 6:45 am EDT
They are sightless, and are apparently not particularly deterred by a stream which intersects their path. Some may also be semi-aquatic.


I like this Roger..."Some may also be semi-aquatic"...Yeah...Like after they fall in...;)

I think we have been near here before in another thread. There may be aquatic centi-millipede's or they may be able to survive the crossing of streams...Otherwise they would have to go around them and would of lived quite an isolated life...;)

My sugesstion is to ignore it from a fishing standpoint or tie yourself up some long-as-hell-shanked Whooly Worms...Here's a small puzzle: Is it Wooly Worm or Whooly Worm or Whooley Worm and why?

Spence
"Even when my best efforts fail it's a satisfying challenge, and that, after all, is the essence of fly fishing." -Chauncy Lively

"Envy not the man who lives beside the river, but the man the river flows through." Joseph T Heywood

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