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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Amphizoa (Amphizoidae) Beetle Larva from Sears Creek in Washington
This is the first of it's family I've seen, collected from a tiny, fishless stream in the Cascades. The three species of this genus all live in the Northwest and are predators that primarily eat stonefly nymphs Merritt R.W., Cummins, K.W., and Berg, M.B. (2019).
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Tt8377
NJ ( but home waters is upper mainstem Delaware)

Posts: 4
Tt8377 on Jun 12, 2011June 12th, 2011, 2:08 pm EDT
Hi, I was fishing the upper Mainstem this weekend and from my camp riverside, I could hear what sounded like little kids splashing and playing in the river. I went down to find what seemed to be thousands of trout splashing in the shallows up and down the river. I tried everything in fly box and only managed to hook and lose one rather quickly. It seemed like I couldn't take a step with out spooking one. I couldn't tell what they were feeding on. Any Ideas why they were acting this way? I've never heard them do this before. Thanks for any feedback.

TT
Adirman
Adirman's profile picture
Monticello, NY

Posts: 479
Adirman on Jun 12, 2011June 12th, 2011, 2:25 pm EDT
Where we talkin about here buddy? When you say Mainstem you mean the Delaware? It DOES make a difference!!

Thanks,
Adirman
Tt8377
NJ ( but home waters is upper mainstem Delaware)

Posts: 4
Tt8377 on Jun 12, 2011June 12th, 2011, 3:22 pm EDT
Sorry, Yes the Upper Main Stem of the Delaware river in NY/PA.
JOHNW
JOHNW's profile picture
Chambersburg, PA

Posts: 452
JOHNW on Jun 13, 2011June 13th, 2011, 12:36 pm EDT
Could be alot of things but my guess would be caddis based on the splashy rises. Then again there are a bunch of "sulphurish" mayflies at this time.
I have had some amazing nights in the riffles of the Upper mainstem. With some really monstorus trout on dries right at and then for about an hour after dark (not sunset but true dark).
How were the water temps as that could possibly play a role in their behavior.
"old habits are hard to kill once you have gray in your beard" -Old Red Barn
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Jun 13, 2011June 13th, 2011, 8:16 pm EDT
While JohnW may be right I'd think more than not what you heard where trout gorging on Green Drake duns. I have witnessed numerous occassions on the upper main where literally every fish, not just trout, are rising in the black of night to the emerging Ep. guttalata nymphs and duns. There are so many rises, and so close to you, that it is kind of scary!
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Oldredbarn
Oldredbarn's profile picture
Novi, MI

Posts: 2600
Oldredbarn on Jun 14, 2011June 14th, 2011, 7:23 am EDT
There are so many rises, and so close to you, that it is kind of scary!


Sounds like fun to this night owl...Like our Brown Drakes & Mr. hex-o-genia! YeeeHaaa!

Matt...You and I shouldn't be schooling 'em...Maybe we should just tell them to stay in their tents afterdark so no one gets hurt or gets in our way...;) Maybe we should tell them how Big Browns go to sleep very early, way before sundown, and there's no one out here, in the dark, cept us meeces!

Spence
"Even when my best efforts fail it's a satisfying challenge, and that, after all, is the essence of fly fishing." -Chauncy Lively

"Envy not the man who lives beside the river, but the man the river flows through." Joseph T Heywood
JOHNW
JOHNW's profile picture
Chambersburg, PA

Posts: 452
JOHNW on Jun 15, 2011June 15th, 2011, 4:29 pm EDT
While JohnW may be right I'd think more than not what you heard where trout gorging on Green Drake duns. I have witnessed numerous occassions on the upper main where literally every fish, not just trout, are rising in the black of night to the emerging Ep. guttalata nymphs and duns. There are so many rises, and so close to you, that it is kind of scary!

I'll yield to Matt on this one my knowledge of the Upper D system is infantile as compare to a guy with a camp on the river.
JW
"old habits are hard to kill once you have gray in your beard" -Old Red Barn
Tt8377
NJ ( but home waters is upper mainstem Delaware)

Posts: 4
Tt8377 on Jun 15, 2011June 15th, 2011, 6:03 pm EDT
I put the flash light on the river many times only to see some small spinners and a few caddis. I saw only a few green drakes the week before although, not that weekend but I'm new to fly fishing, especially in the middle of the night. Thanks for the insight. I may try and get up there this weekend and give it another go.

TT
JOHNW
JOHNW's profile picture
Chambersburg, PA

Posts: 452
JOHNW on Jun 16, 2011June 16th, 2011, 2:58 pm EDT
TT,
have some Epeorus with you (think smallish sulphurs with a pink cast to them). Also don't be affraid to throw some oversized rusty brown spinners at them. Sometimes the memory of big meals sticks for a while after the big bugs are gone. Also there should be some isos about.

Finally if you wait until after dark fish to the sound and pattern won't be nearly as important.
Best of luck,
JW
"old habits are hard to kill once you have gray in your beard" -Old Red Barn
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Jun 18, 2011June 18th, 2011
Maybe it wasn't Green Drakes, maybe it was a family of Susquatch out there having a skinny dip party.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Jun 19, 2011June 19th, 2011, 8:24 am EDT
I put the flash light on the river many times only to see some small spinners and a few caddis.


Tt8377,

Just a thought, but if no Green Drakes were seen, I'm with John in thinking that the caddisflies may have been the cause. The small spinners would be unlikely to generate the splashy response that you describe, and the timing and activity reminds me of a Psilotreta (Dark Blue Sedge) emergence. These can be highly concentrated affairs, but very few (adult) caddisflies would be seen on the water's surface during the emergence. Were any of the caddisflies that you saw about a #14 with plain dark wings?
Tt8377
NJ ( but home waters is upper mainstem Delaware)

Posts: 4
Tt8377 on Jul 5, 2011July 5th, 2011, 12:57 pm EDT
Update:

I went back up a couple weeks later and same splashing in evening but much less frequently. Could they have been shad??? I didnt see any the next time but certainly heard them. I did see the dark blue sedge during the day that week in large quantities, so that may have been what they were feeding on. Thanks again for everyone's thoughts. I'm going to try to get up there in a few weeks and at least try for some walleye at night. I hear they ar good eating.

TT
JOHNW
JOHNW's profile picture
Chambersburg, PA

Posts: 452
JOHNW on Jul 5, 2011July 5th, 2011, 2:01 pm EDT
Seems late for shad but it could be a possibility with the high cold water this spring.
I'm told they are on hell of a fight if you can hook one.
JW
"old habits are hard to kill once you have gray in your beard" -Old Red Barn
Oldredbarn
Oldredbarn's profile picture
Novi, MI

Posts: 2600
Oldredbarn on Jul 6, 2011July 6th, 2011, 9:40 am EDT
To check out some "night fishing" go to www.gateslodge.com and check out the "fishing report" page. Joe there holding the monster trout works in the shop and check out the bat photo there as well.

Spence
"Even when my best efforts fail it's a satisfying challenge, and that, after all, is the essence of fly fishing." -Chauncy Lively

"Envy not the man who lives beside the river, but the man the river flows through." Joseph T Heywood

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