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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Zapada cinctipes (Nemouridae) (Tiny Winter Black) Stonefly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
Nymphs of this species were fairly common in late-winter kick net samples from the upper Yakima River. Although I could not find a key to species of Zapada nymphs, a revision of the Nemouridae family by Baumann (1975) includes the following helpful sentence: "2 cervical gills on each side of midline, 1 arising inside and 1 outside of lateral cervical sclerites, usually single and elongate, sometimes constricted but with 3 or 4 branches arising beyond gill base in Zapada cinctipes." This specimen clearly has the branches and is within the range of that species.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Lastchance
Portage, PA

Posts: 437
Lastchance on Dec 17, 2010December 17th, 2010, 2:40 am EST
This requires a one letter reply. I realize I'm asking a lot because brevity is a word foreign to this board. Please, no long winded, esoteric, essays about nothing.


A small creek with fish in it is called:

A.)a rivulet

B.)a rill

C.)a small creek with fish in it


Merry Christmas to all and to all a good night? Keep Christ in Christmas and have a great New Year.
Your Friend,
Bruce



P.S. Once written: "If you can't write your idea on the back of my calling (business) card then you don't have a clear idea."
Gutcutter
Gutcutter's profile picture
Pennsylvania

Posts: 470
Gutcutter on Dec 17, 2010December 17th, 2010, 3:35 am EST
D.) - none of the above.
it is called a "crick"

All men who fish may in turn be divided into two parts: those who fish for trout and those who don't. Trout fishermen are a race apart: they are a dedicated crew- indolent, improvident, and quietly mad.

-Robert Traver, Trout Madness
Oldredbarn
Oldredbarn's profile picture
Novi, MI

Posts: 2600
Oldredbarn on Dec 17, 2010December 17th, 2010, 7:20 am EST
He isn't talking about me or you is he...Paul? :)

I kind of agree with Tony but I'll just call it a nursery.

Merry Christmas...Right back at you!

Spence the Muted

"Even when my best efforts fail it's a satisfying challenge, and that, after all, is the essence of fly fishing." -Chauncy Lively

"Envy not the man who lives beside the river, but the man the river flows through." Joseph T Heywood
JAD
JAD's profile picture
Alexandria Pa

Posts: 362
JAD on Dec 17, 2010December 17th, 2010, 7:41 am EST
I'll take a guess and say.

D-- It"s home to the fish.

Merry Christmas

John

They fasten red (crimson red) wool around a hook, and fix onto the wool two feathers which grow under a cock’s wattles, and which in colour are like wax.
Radcliffe's Fishing from the Earliest Times,
Motrout
Motrout's profile picture
Posts: 319
Motrout on Dec 17, 2010December 17th, 2010, 8:35 am EST
Well, you see, a small stream with trout in it can have a variety of names. If you're in Vermont, New Hampshire, or the Adirondacks, it's a brook, in parts of New York, Pennsylvania, and Vermont, it's called a kill, in southern Missouri it's a "crik" or a "branch", in some parts of the east it's a run. Now which is the best, now that's a hard one. Personally I prefer "creek" because it's generic and most people will know what you mean when you say that, but if you ask my friend in New York, he'd be upset and say that is not a refined enough name and that all small streams shall be referred to as brooks, and if you ask my friend in the southern part of Missouri, they'll tell me to stop talking like one a them northerner-it's a crik for goodness sakes, or a branch if you have to be too awful particular about it. And the same people would refer to a very small stream (one that doesn't always hold water)as a wash. And I almost forgot that in some parts of northern lake country, they call the rivers that connect lakes narrows.

Okay, that's all I've got I think. I was gonna see how long I could make that go (since a short answer was asked for), but I think that's it.

"I don't know what fly fishing teaches us, but I think it's something we need to know."-John Gierach
http://fishingintheozarks.blogspot.com/
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Dec 17, 2010December 17th, 2010, 8:36 am EST
OK I get it...I think...

A rill by definition could not contain trout.
A rivulet might.
But...C is ...redundant.

Oh, I could go on alright. A meager sampling:

E, F, G,…:
…, river, stream, creek, brook, beck, headwater, reach, spring, seep, feed, tributary, stem, nursery water, flow, current, spate, torrent, cascade, falls, riffle, pool, cut, pocket, basin, head, tail, broken, flat, slick, ‘nervous’ water, ... and on and on….

Let there be no shortage of creative descriptors. But, agreed: if they are used more than once (not tongue in cheek), they should at least be accurate.

Comprende.
Lastchance
Portage, PA

Posts: 437
Lastchance on Dec 17, 2010December 17th, 2010, 9:35 am EST
Just playing. Gees I can't even tick you guys off.
Bruce
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Dec 18, 2010December 18th, 2010, 1:56 am EST
Now why would you want to do that?
Lastchance
Portage, PA

Posts: 437
Lastchance on Dec 18, 2010December 18th, 2010, 3:35 am EST
I don't really want to make you mad just thought I might start a humorous exchange.
Bruce
Bippie
Altoona, PA

Posts: 25
Bippie on Dec 19, 2010December 19th, 2010, 1:36 pm EST
Well..... I'm originally from Portage PA and we always called it a "creek" (pronounced "crick"). ;-)
Oldredbarn
Oldredbarn's profile picture
Novi, MI

Posts: 2600
Oldredbarn on Dec 20, 2010December 20th, 2010, 8:55 am EST
humorous exchange


My grandmother (she grew up in the mountains of Maryland) was stammering one time and trying her damnest to remember its name and blurted out, "You know what it's called Spence! That big ditch out west. What's it's name?"

She was trying to remember Grande Canyon.

This has become a standing family joke many, many years after she has passed...No one can bring up the Grande Canyon with out someone chiming in..."You know! That big ditch out west!"

So, here's my thoughts...If you can actually straddle it with a foot on each side and the damn thing's running between your legs, and it has trout in it, we shall call it a crick (creek)...No trout...It's just a damn ditch.

Spence
"Even when my best efforts fail it's a satisfying challenge, and that, after all, is the essence of fly fishing." -Chauncy Lively

"Envy not the man who lives beside the river, but the man the river flows through." Joseph T Heywood
Lastchance
Portage, PA

Posts: 437
Lastchance on Dec 20, 2010December 20th, 2010, 10:39 am EST
Yep. It's crick where I come from.
Bruce

I also studied ballogy in high school.

Youns's is the plural of youns.
Bippie
Altoona, PA

Posts: 25
Bippie on Dec 20, 2010December 20th, 2010, 1:06 pm EST
I concur with Lastchance!

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