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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Glossosoma (Glossosomatidae) (Little Brown Short-horned Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
I caught this tiny larva without a case, but it seems to key pretty clearly to to Glossosomatidae. From there, the lack of sclerites on the mesonotum points to either Glossosoma or Anagapetus. Although it's difficult to see in a 2D image from the microscope, it's pretty clear in the live 3D view that the pronotum is only excised about 1/3 of its length to accommodate the forecoxa, not 2/3, which points to Glossosoma at Couplet 5 of the Key to Genera of Glossosomatidae Larvae.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Gutcutter has attached this picture to aid in identification. The message is below.
Gutcutter
Gutcutter's profile picture
Pennsylvania

Posts: 470
Gutcutter on Jun 11, 2010June 11th, 2010, 3:42 pm EDT
i am finally figuring out how to use my macro setting.
i seined these in mid may on a spring creek.
after the photo session, i caught a bunch of fish sight nymphing an unweighted biot body nymph that looked something like the larger specimen.
sorry about the palm of my hand, roger. i honestly do keep reminding myself to bring along a white lid. i think i left it in the right front inside pocket of spence's vest, next to the space blanket...
All men who fish may in turn be divided into two parts: those who fish for trout and those who don't. Trout fishermen are a race apart: they are a dedicated crew- indolent, improvident, and quietly mad.

-Robert Traver, Trout Madness
Wiflyfisher
Wiflyfisher's profile picture
Wisconsin

Posts: 622
Wiflyfisher on Jun 11, 2010June 11th, 2010, 3:53 pm EDT
Hey, you are getting there with macro shots!

The larger one looks like Maccaffertium (could be vicarium), it's definitely a clinger. The smaller nymph looks like Ephemerella (could be subvaria).... Hendrickson.

Oldredbarn
Oldredbarn's profile picture
Novi, MI

Posts: 2600
Oldredbarn on Jun 11, 2010June 11th, 2010, 4:14 pm EDT
Tony,

I was wondering where that extra lid came from!!! You know I have problems already...Carry your own damn lid! Hell...Now that I think about it, one never knows when an extra lid may come in handy...I think I can squeeze it in...somewhere.

Spence
"Even when my best efforts fail it's a satisfying challenge, and that, after all, is the essence of fly fishing." -Chauncy Lively

"Envy not the man who lives beside the river, but the man the river flows through." Joseph T Heywood
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Jun 11, 2010June 11th, 2010, 6:42 pm EDT
sorry about the palm of my hand, roger. i honestly do keep reminding myself to bring along a white lid. i think i left it in the right front inside pocket of spence's vest, next to the space blanket...


Hmmm, Tony, I would have thought better of you!
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Gutcutter
Gutcutter's profile picture
Pennsylvania

Posts: 470
Gutcutter on Jun 12, 2010June 12th, 2010, 2:31 am EDT
sorry that there is no size reference in the photo. the Ephemerella was around a size 20. my thought was dorothea. the clinger is beyond my limited ability to even guess. what are the common cahill species in this region. plenty of dorothea and invaria hatching and dropping that evening. also a good number of "lt. cahills". could these be ithaca or canadense nymphs?
i'll be without my computer for the next few days - gotta go and chase some Megalops atlanticus, but i look forward to your thoughts.
if i start trying to identify shrimp and crabs down to the genus and species i'll need a psychiatrist (or spence) to help bring me back to sanity...
maybe (hopefully!) some photos to follow
All men who fish may in turn be divided into two parts: those who fish for trout and those who don't. Trout fishermen are a race apart: they are a dedicated crew- indolent, improvident, and quietly mad.

-Robert Traver, Trout Madness
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Jun 12, 2010June 12th, 2010, 4:48 pm EDT
the Ephemerella was around a size 20. my thought was dorothea.
That is my thought as well, though it is impossible to be sure from the photo. (It is a mature nymph--a "blackwing"--and if the "dorothea" that you were seeing had unmarked tails, the ID would seem probable.) I agree with John that the "clinger" is probably Maccaffertium. If you can remember to flip the flattened clingers over and photograph the undersides, the species can often be recognized by the ventral markings. (You can put that reminder on the same list as remembering to retrieve your white lid from Spence's vest, assuming that it can be found amid all the paraphernalia he carries. That man is a human Swiss Army knife!)
Shawnny3
Moderator
Pleasant Gap, PA

Posts: 1197
Shawnny3 on Jun 13, 2010June 13th, 2010, 12:58 pm EDT
What would be other possibilities, out of curiosity? I was pleased with myself that I immediately thought March Brown and subsequently found that that's what you guys meant by Maccaffertium. But in the interest of confusing myself, I'd like to know the other options.

-Shawn
Jewelry-Quality Artistic Salmon Flies, by Shawn Davis
www.davisflydesigns.com
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Jun 13, 2010June 13th, 2010, 5:43 pm EDT
Shawn,

Stenacron, Maccaffertium, and Stenonema (femoratum) nymphs all look pretty similar. All are "flattened clingers" with broad rounded heads, flattened femurs, three tails, and slender (or "threadlike") 7th gills. One way to make sense of the current taxonomic scheme of this group is to remember that the other gills are pointed at the tip in Stenacron, squarish (truncated) at the tip in Maccaffertium, and rounded at the tip in Stenonema (femoratum).

Within Maccaffertium, PA species include vicarium (March Brown/Grey Fox), ithaca (sometimes called a Grey Fox, but also called a Ginger Quill), modestum, mediopunctatum, terminatum, pulchellum, and a few less common species. (Members of the last group are most often referred to as "Light Cahills," but that name is also used for Stenacron species.)

Are you confused yet?
JOHNW
JOHNW's profile picture
Chambersburg, PA

Posts: 452
JOHNW on Jun 14, 2010June 14th, 2010, 11:41 am EDT
So my little taxonomic scheme of robust PT or slender PT and Big, Medium, little and tiny yellowish white bugs probably wouldn't work?
Just don't tell the trout they eat my big yellowish bugs just fine! ;)
John
"old habits are hard to kill once you have gray in your beard" -Old Red Barn

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