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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Glossosoma (Glossosomatidae) (Little Brown Short-horned Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
I caught this tiny larva without a case, but it seems to key pretty clearly to to Glossosomatidae. From there, the lack of sclerites on the mesonotum points to either Glossosoma or Anagapetus. Although it's difficult to see in a 2D image from the microscope, it's pretty clear in the live 3D view that the pronotum is only excised about 1/3 of its length to accommodate the forecoxa, not 2/3, which points to Glossosoma at Couplet 5 of the Key to Genera of Glossosomatidae Larvae.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Bcvizina has attached these 5 pictures. The message is below.
Bcvizina
Northern Michigan

Posts: 30
Bcvizina on Mar 15, 2010March 15th, 2010, 4:15 pm EDT
I took a couple pictures with a Canon EOS Digital Rebel because it's the only camera I could get with a semi-macro lens. I can also get my hands on a Canon EOS 7D, but I don't have any kind of macro lens for that camera. What would be a good cheap lens for taking pictures of aquatic insects?
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Mar 15, 2010March 15th, 2010, 5:34 pm EDT
Very nice, Brent.

The 1st four photos appear to be of Boreal Stones (Acroneuria lycorias), which are of family Perlidae (Common Stones).

As to a "good cheap" macro lens for your EOS 7D, apart from the fact that "good" and "cheap" are probably mutually exclusive attributes, unless you venture into the used macro lens marketplace, I suspect somewhere around $350 dollars is probably pretty much entry level. However, others may be able to give you specific recommendations.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Troutnut
Troutnut's profile picture
Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Mar 15, 2010March 15th, 2010, 5:45 pm EDT
The bottom bug is a Taeniopterygid stonefly, I'm guessing Taeniopteryx but Strophopteryx would also be possible... I don't know a way to tell from these photos.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Mar 15, 2010March 15th, 2010, 6:15 pm EDT

Hi Jason,

Wow, my reputation for being the "fastest gun in the West" is in serious jeopardy if I slow down even a smidgen. Ready, fire, aim, as they say. However, I may be okay for a while, as the demands of matrimony are sure to take their toll. Just kidding, sort of.

Anyway, I suspect Brent's last photo to be of an Eastern Willowfly (Taeniopteryx burksi). Please see this one identified by Dr. Donald S. Chandler for comparison purposes.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Wiflyfisher
Wiflyfisher's profile picture
Wisconsin

Posts: 622
Wiflyfisher on Mar 16, 2010March 16th, 2010, 9:28 am EDT
I have a Canon EOS Digital Rebel XTi and I love the camera. For macro work I am thinking of buying this macro lens this year...

http://www.buy.com/prod/canon-ef-50mm-f-2-5-compact-macro-lens-1x-50mm-f-2-5/q/listingid/67296338/loc/111/204049851.html

Canon has a better one in a 60 mm but it is almost 200 bucks more, which is more than I want to spend. Especially since I mainly use my macro photos for the web and I don't need 300 dpi print type photos.

However, I may be okay for a while, as the demands of matrimony are sure to take their toll. Just kidding, sort of.


Roger, I found if you let your better-half have her own passionate past-time hobbies, it helps eliminate cramping your style. Although, kids, wife, pets, college tuition, taxes, honey-do projects, etc... do take their toll. :)

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