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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Setvena wahkeena (Perlodidae) (Wahkeena Springfly) Stonefly Nymph from Mystery Creek #199 in Washington
As far as I can tell, this species has only previously been reported from one site in Oregon along the Columbia gorge. However, the key characteristics are fairly unmistakable in all except for one minor detail:
— 4 small yellow spots on frons visible in photos
— Narrow occipital spinule row curves forward (but doesn’t quite meet on stem of ecdysial suture, as it's supposed to in this species)
— Short spinules on anterior margin of front legs
— Short rposterior row of blunt spinules on abdominal tergae, rather than elongated spinules dorsally
I caught several of these mature nymphs in the fishless, tiny headwaters of a creek high in the Wenatchee Mountains.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Flags
Northwestern Pennsylvania

Posts: 14
Flags on Feb 13, 2009February 13th, 2009, 3:15 am EST
Gonzo:

I am fascinated by your book........still studying it and getting ready to try some of your patterns. Truly fascinating techniques!

I am trying to locate some "poly yarn" and want to make sure I get the right stuff. Any suggestions on retail sources would be appreciated.
By the way, how do you come to know so much about Mad Dog 20-20? LOL

Regards,

Flags
Stay focused on what is important in life...........
Troutnut
Troutnut's profile picture
Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Feb 13, 2009February 13th, 2009, 5:44 am EST
I can take that one: Yes, Poly yarn is short for polypropylene yarn. Can't help you with the Mad Dog, though...
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Aaron7_8
Aaron7_8's profile picture
Helena Montana

Posts: 115
Aaron7_8 on Feb 16, 2009February 16th, 2009, 3:17 am EST
Mad dog 20/20 the thing of legends at high school and college parties. Also a favoroite of gentlemen that sleep on a park bench.
Flags
Northwestern Pennsylvania

Posts: 14
Flags on Feb 17, 2009February 17th, 2009, 2:08 am EST
Mad Dog 20/20.....one step down from Richard's Wild Irish Rose consumed between classes on the banks of the Allegheny River in Olean, New York.......ahhhhhh, the memories.............

should have not skipped bilology class...........LOl

Flags

Stay focused on what is important in life...........
Patcrisci
Lagrangeville, NY

Posts: 119
Patcrisci on Feb 21, 2009February 21st, 2009, 2:51 am EST
Hey, to get back on thread here, is poly good for tying shucks on emergers and cripples?
Pat Crisci
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Feb 21, 2009February 21st, 2009, 7:01 am EST
Poly yarn floats, so don't use it on emergers where you want the shuck or abdomen under water--such as with emergers tied on scud hooks. Antron or, evern better, Zelon, don't float as well and make better shucks generally.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Patcrisci
Lagrangeville, NY

Posts: 119
Patcrisci on Feb 21, 2009February 21st, 2009, 12:40 pm EST
I've used poly yarn for years for making spent spinner wings and parachute posts.
Pat Crisci
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Feb 21, 2009February 21st, 2009, 3:58 pm EST
Yes, that's where I use it most. And Lloyd Gonzales burns bunches of it into very serviceable wings for his fly patterns. See his book, Fly Fishing Pressured Water.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Mar 27, 2009March 27th, 2009, 4:56 am EDT
Flags,

Thank you. I trust that your questions about "poly" yarn have been answered. As for your other question:

...how do come to know so much about Mad Dog 20/20?


The sentence to which you refer also mentions noted wine connoisseur Robert Parker. Let's just say that my tastes are eclectic and leave it at that. :)
Patcrisci
Lagrangeville, NY

Posts: 119
Patcrisci on Mar 27, 2009March 27th, 2009, 5:43 am EDT
Ah, yes, Mad Dog 20/20, I think Parker rated it a 99 out of 100 points.
Pat Crisci
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Mar 27, 2009March 27th, 2009, 6:52 am EDT
Pat, as I recall, that was in his article entitled "Best Grape-Based Alternatives to Drinking Ethanol" in Wino Quarterly. (But then again, my memory of that might be a little hazy, so I could be wrong.)
Patcrisci
Lagrangeville, NY

Posts: 119
Patcrisci on Mar 28, 2009March 28th, 2009, 9:57 am EDT
ha, ha, i like that GOnzo. Does anyone remember boone's farm apple wine? now, that was a heady quaff! i remember buying a 750ml bottle for 99 cents.
Pat Crisci

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