Header image
Enter a name
Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Epeorus albertae (Heptageniidae) (Pink Lady) Mayfly Nymph from the East Fork Issaquah Creek in Washington
This specimen keys to the Epeorus albertae group of species. Of the five species in that group, the two known in Washington state are Epeorus albertae and Epeorus dulciana. Of the two, albertae has been collected in vastly more locations in Washington than dulciana, suggesting it is far more common. On that basis alone I'm tentatively putting this nymph in albertae, with the large caveat that there's no real information to rule out dulciana.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Trtklr
Banned
Michigan

Posts: 115
Trtklr on Jul 14, 2008July 14th, 2008, 4:24 am EDT
Water is our most valuable resource,and I am all in favor of keeping our water clean. Did you all know that the waters in Michigan have gotten cleaner over the last 40 years? Did you also know that as a result of cleaner water on the Au Sauble that fish size has dropped? DNR is looking at ways of getting more nutrients into the river system.
I have seen nothing more beautiful than the sunrise on a cold stream.
PRohlfsen
Chaska, Minnesota

Posts: 4
PRohlfsen on Jul 16, 2008July 16th, 2008, 6:44 am EDT
Hi Everyone! I am new to TroutNut and what a great article to start with.

I thought just for fun I would bring up Minnesota. No, its not the "best trout water" but I have had some great experiences here. My favorite place to go is a little stream in the Southwest of Minnesota in Beaver Creek valley state park. (what a load off to finally share it). I am still a very novice fly-fisherman but my passion for it will drive me to be better someday.

Anyways! Beaver Creek Valley State park is centered on a little spring coming out of a rock wall and you have to walk to at least an hour to get to trout water. The Valley is quaint and beautiful, the water is crisp and untouched, the the surroundings are beautiful.

Just thought I would share where my heart lies at the moment. Can't wait to go back

-Patrick
Patrick
http://dimensionalglass.blogspot.com

Be the fly, Be the fly...beeeeeee the fllyyy.
Shawnny3
Moderator
Pleasant Gap, PA

Posts: 1197
Shawnny3 on Jul 16, 2008July 16th, 2008, 8:18 am EDT
you have to walk to at least an hour to get to trout water


This precludes about 98% of the flyfishing community from taking your spot - even if it's no longer a secret, your fishing is pretty safe.

Welcome to the forum, Patrick.

-Shawn

P.S. That reminds me of a story John Gierach tells in his book, Fly Fishing Small Streams (an excellent book, by the way). In describing a favorite stream, he tells of a point on the trail where you can literally see the spot at which countless fishermen had stopped, taken a disappointed look around, and then turned back downstream to fish the bigger water. According to Gierach, just upstream of that spot is where the fishing really starts to get special.
Jewelry-Quality Artistic Salmon Flies, by Shawn Davis
www.davisflydesigns.com
Smallstream
State College, PA

Posts: 103
Smallstream on Jul 16, 2008July 16th, 2008, 11:10 am EDT
If when you mean "best trout water" are you talking about the places with the best trout populations of trout, the highest number of quality trout streams, the best wild trout populations, the best habitat, the best water quality and the least pollution plus the best average sizes of trout? If you are then I don't think that anybody can deny that one of the western states probably takes the prize then. I would put my life on that actually. If your talking peoples favorite places to trout fish than you will get tons of different answers, but If you clear away all the bias, I hate to say it, the west is the best.
Trtklr
Banned
Michigan

Posts: 115
Trtklr on Jul 16, 2008July 16th, 2008, 12:16 pm EDT
smallstream, if you had to pick one state to fish for the rest of your life it would be . . .
I have seen nothing more beautiful than the sunrise on a cold stream.
PRohlfsen
Chaska, Minnesota

Posts: 4
PRohlfsen on Jul 17, 2008July 17th, 2008, 6:13 am EDT
Shawn,

The first time I walked all morning I was starting to get discouraged at the stream and then their was a fast moving bend and I think there must have been another spring feeding it becouse the waterway grew quiet a bit.

Thank you for the greating, I look forward to contributing in my own way (probobly most commonly in the form of questions)

Your flies are beautiful. I work in glass (a blaster, not a blower) and you colors remind me of my own work. www.dimensionalglass.blogspot.com

Patrick
http://dimensionalglass.blogspot.com

Be the fly, Be the fly...beeeeeee the fllyyy.
Smallstream
State College, PA

Posts: 103
Smallstream on Jul 17, 2008July 17th, 2008, 6:58 am EDT
I guess wyoming or montana, but picking from those western states would be a tough choice haha.
Shawnny3
Moderator
Pleasant Gap, PA

Posts: 1197
Shawnny3 on Jul 17, 2008July 17th, 2008, 4:15 pm EDT
Stunning work, Patrick. You have a wonderful eye for color and shape. It is hard to convey meaning in abstraction, but you communicate very well through your work. I am flattered you like my work and compare it with your own.

-Shawn
Jewelry-Quality Artistic Salmon Flies, by Shawn Davis
www.davisflydesigns.com
Flybyknight
Milton, DE

Posts: 82
Flybyknight on Jul 18, 2008July 18th, 2008, 12:05 pm EDT
I don't want much, just:

Solitude
Silence
&
Scenery

Dick
Lightly on the dimpling eddy fling;
the hypocritic fly's unruffled wing.
Thomas Scott
Leakywaders
New England

Posts: 43
Leakywaders on Jul 20, 2008July 20th, 2008, 12:09 pm EDT
Hi,
In the '70s I tried to fish for trout here in Mass. There were very few wild trout, yup lots of pollution. Since I didn't have the time, money, etc to go back to my native VT, I fished for bass. Right now, I'm finding that has changed, the forests are recovering from excessive logging (our hills were barren a century ago), the polution has been cleaned up (except for PCBs, and they are only in some rivers), and there are now wild trout in rivers that were cess pools in the '70s. The waste water treatement plants make the water more fertle than they were, so there are more insects, etc. The rivers with PCBs are not stocked, and the meat fishermen don't go there, so you are fishing for wild trout, with other catch and release fishermen. I've seldom left New England becouse I feel that WHAT you are is more important than WHERE you are. The world is NOT going to adapt ti your expectations, you have to adapt. You can find good fishing wherever you live if you look for it.
Drag free??? If the fly didn't drag, I wouldn't know where it was!!
Aaron7_8
Aaron7_8's profile picture
Helena Montana

Posts: 115
Aaron7_8 on Jul 27, 2008July 27th, 2008, 5:04 am EDT
Just a note about the tailings ponds around Butte several of them have fishable populations of large trout 5-10 pounds in fact. Now that is not to say that you can eat them because they are catch and release, because of the heavy metals, but there are fish in those places. Even in Butte in Silver Bow Creek there are now counted populations of very water sensitive cuthrost trout. Yes this area of Montana has a long way to go to be healthy again but it is on the way.

Quick Reply

Related Discussions

Topic
Replies
Last Reply
2
Apr 1, 2017
by Iasgair
6
Sep 5, 2010
by Jesse
2
Sep 5, 2009
by Martinlf
2
Mar 28, 2016
by TimCat
Troutnut.com is copyright © 2004-2024 (email Jason). privacy policy