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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Landscape & scenery photos from Denali National Park

A large caribou walks through the bed of a glacial river in Denali National Park.

From Denali National Park in Alaska
Denali National Park in Alaska
This is the first grizzly bear I've seen.  It's in Denali National Park.  People with long-range binoculars, plus the view through a couple spotting scopes the park installed at this stop, verified that the little light spot my arrow is pointing to is, in fact, a grizzly bear.  This is the closest view I got.

From Denali National Park in Alaska
In this "close up" of a grizzly bear laying down on an alpine hillside in Denali National Park, you can almost tell it's a bear.

From Denali National Park in Alaska
Denali National Park in Alaska
Dall Sheep in Denali National Park.

From Denali National Park in Alaska
Denali National Park in Alaska
Denali National Park in Alaska
Denali National Park in Alaska
Denali National Park in Alaska
Denali National Park in Alaska
Denali National Park in Alaska

Closeup insects by Bnewell from Denali National Park in Alaska

Siphlonurus phyllis (Siphlonuridae) (Gray Drake) Mayfly Nymph from Temporary ponds- Glacier Nat. Park in Alaska
This specimen was the first record from Montana and the first record from the mountain west except Alberta where it was first described. It was found in temporary ponds.The nymph has double gills on all segments. The abdominal stripe is an important feature for identification
Limnephilus externus (Limnephilidae) (Summer Flier Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from Temporary ponds- Glacier Nat. Park in Alaska
This caddis is one of the most abundant caddisflies in temporary ponds of Glacier Park. The larvae build a round case of detritus and dead plant material that can get quite large.
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