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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Lateral view of a Male Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #308 in Washington
This dun emerged from a mature nymph on my desk. Unfortunately its wings didn't perfectly dry out.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Martinlf
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Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jun 27, 2020June 27th, 2020, 3:42 pm EDT
Perhaps Lee can help with this one. I seem to recall he had something to say about blue quills a few years back. Around noon on a small Central Pennsylvania spring creek I found clouds of what I'm relatively sure were blue quill spinners. It would have been heaven to have been there when they fell--if they fell on the water. Does anyone know about these spinners? The time of day they tend to drop, for example, and how to fish them?
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Taxon
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Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Jun 27, 2020June 27th, 2020, 4:31 pm EDT
Hi Louis-

I would expect the spinner fall to occur in the evening as darkness approaches. Incidentally, Paraleptophlebia mollis was re-classfied as Neoleptophlebia mollis some years ago.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Martinlf
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Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jun 28, 2020June 28th, 2020, 10:53 am EDT
Thanks, Roger!!
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Wiflyfisher
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Wisconsin

Posts: 622
Wiflyfisher on Jun 29, 2020June 29th, 2020, 10:28 pm EDT
Louis,

Did you notice any females with egg sacks? I ask that because at times I have noticed on occasion swarming male spinners and no females. My guess is they are just excited and practicing for the big event.

Also, as i am sure you already know, dark cloudy weather can trigger a spinner fall.
Martinlf
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Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jun 30, 2020June 30th, 2020, 3:53 am EDT
John, I didn't get a close look at them. This spinner fall seems to be somewhat of a mystery. I've read and asked buddies about it, getting a variety of answers, but nobody seems to have figured it out for sure. I've heard that at least some of the spinners return to and fall on land. Part of the issue may be that the hatch comes in the summer, when many are either not fishing much, or primarily early, looking for cooled water or Tricos. There were just so many bugs, though, it made me want to figure out when and if they hit the water. I may head back up to the stream in the late afternoon to wait out the bugs and see if they fall in the evening. If the hatch is still going on. I may have just hit a peak day, and not find any bugs when I get back. Any experiences anyone has had, or knows about would be welcome.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell

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