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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Pdcox has attached these 2 pictures to aid in identification. The message is below.
Pdcox
Kansas city

Posts: 12
Pdcox on Oct 30, 2019October 30th, 2019, 4:07 am EDT
Hi, just a rookie here. Found this bug in a mountain freestone stream central Colorado. Curious about the fed/orange bands around body. Any help in ID?
Thanks
Creno
Grants Pass, OR

Posts: 302
Creno on Oct 30, 2019October 30th, 2019, 6:29 am EDT
the red spots look like mites. Fairly common on aquatic insects
Taxon
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Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Oct 30, 2019October 30th, 2019, 7:39 am EDT
Hi Paul-

I believe the stonefly nymph you found in a central Colorado stream to be of family Perlodidae. With regard to what you describe as the orange bands, I suspect that to be a parasitic infestation of orange-colored water mites.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Pdcox
Kansas city

Posts: 12
Pdcox on Oct 30, 2019October 30th, 2019, 9:26 am EDT
thank you
Pdcox
Kansas city

Posts: 12
Pdcox on Oct 30, 2019October 30th, 2019, 9:27 am EDT
thanks
Martinlf
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Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Nov 19, 2019November 19th, 2019, 1:55 pm EST
I suspect that to be a parasitic infestation of orange-colored water mites.


Yikes!!

Hey Roger, how the heck are you? Well, I hope.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Jmd123
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Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Nov 20, 2019November 20th, 2019, 6:09 am EST
I can see 'em...would you all believe I have seen the red mites on water scorpions? As in Ranatra fusca, which looks for all the world like an aquatic preying mantis...

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...
Martinlf
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Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Nov 20, 2019November 20th, 2019, 4:33 pm EST
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Taxon
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Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Dec 5, 2019December 5th, 2019, 6:57 am EST
I suspect that to be a parasitic infestation of orange-colored water mites.


Yikes!!

Hey Roger, how the heck are you? Well, I hope.



Hi Louis-

I'm fit as a fiddle, and happy as a clam at high tide. Thanks for inquiring.

Best regards,
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Martinlf
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Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Dec 8, 2019December 8th, 2019, 8:32 am EST
Glad to hear it, Roger. Hope you have a great holiday season. All best to you,
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Taxon
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Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Dec 8, 2019December 8th, 2019, 4:41 pm EST
Likewise, Louis.

Best regards,
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com

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