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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Sweltsa (Chloroperlidae) (Sallfly) Stonefly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
This species was fairly abundant in a February sample of the upper Yakima.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Millcreek has attached these 6 pictures to aid in identification. The message is below.
Epeorus longimanus. 10 mm excluding cerci.
Epeorus longimanus. 10 mm excluding cerci.
Siphlonurus sp. 9 mm excluding cerci.
Siphlonurus sp. 9 mm excluding cerci.
Ameletus sp. 15 mm excluding cerci.
Ameletus sp. 15 mm excluding cerci.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Mar 8, 2015March 8th, 2015, 7:45 am EDT
The Russian River is starting to pick up in terms of critters. First is Epeorus longimanus, followed by a Siphlonurus sp. Last are a couple of Ameletus sp.

Any ideas about the specific name of the Siphlonurus sp. would be greatly appreciated.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Oldredbarn
Oldredbarn's profile picture
Novi, MI

Posts: 2600
Oldredbarn on Mar 17, 2015March 17th, 2015, 6:50 am EDT
Who said we haven't been visited by aliens?! Those first two are for sure visitors from somewhere else...It's not "The truth is out there", it's "The truth is hiding in our rivers"...:)

Spence

Nice photos! Thanks!
"Even when my best efforts fail it's a satisfying challenge, and that, after all, is the essence of fly fishing." -Chauncy Lively

"Envy not the man who lives beside the river, but the man the river flows through." Joseph T Heywood
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Mar 18, 2015March 18th, 2015, 10:12 am EDT
It's a good deal more likely that they see us as aliens. They've been around a good deal longer and probably look on us as the bipedal pinkies who periodically bother them.:)

Nice photos! Thanks!


You're welcome.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Jmd123
Jmd123's profile picture
Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Mar 18, 2015March 18th, 2015, 6:25 pm EDT
Hey, Heptageniids are cool and they know it...

Nice photos of some very pretty creastures, once agin!

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...
Oldredbarn
Oldredbarn's profile picture
Novi, MI

Posts: 2600
Oldredbarn on Mar 18, 2015March 18th, 2015, 9:27 pm EDT
It's a good deal more likely that they see us as aliens.


No doubt! :)

Spence
"Even when my best efforts fail it's a satisfying challenge, and that, after all, is the essence of fly fishing." -Chauncy Lively

"Envy not the man who lives beside the river, but the man the river flows through." Joseph T Heywood
Hansolo
Posts: 2
Hansolo on Jun 4, 2016June 4th, 2016, 10:28 am EDT
Just bought house on Russian river. Love seeing mayflies hugging the doorframes in the early mornings. Reminds me of the east coast where I used to fly fish the Farmington and housatonic year-round.

When gardening I see insects in the dirt I've never seen before anywhere. They look like mayfly nymphs. They are anywhere from a millimeter to an inch long. They look like all-brown versions of Baetis nymphs, skinny, compact, perhaps 2 tails. They crawl over rocks, my planters, the dirt, anywhere.

Are there such things as terrestrial mayfly nymphs that live their entire lives close to rivers but on land?!?

If so, what variety are they? I want to create a ceramic address/nameplate at bottom of my driveway with a sketch of one of these things. Thanks.
Creno
Grants Pass, OR

Posts: 302
Creno on Jun 4, 2016June 4th, 2016, 11:21 am EDT
Hansolo - my wife once said earwigs looked like mayfly nymphs.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earwig

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