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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Dorsal view of a Pycnopsyche guttifera (Limnephilidae) (Great Autumn Brown Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen appears to be of the same species as this one collected in the same spot two months earlier. The identification of both is tentative. This one suffered some physical damage before being photographed, too, so the colors aren't totally natural. I was mostly photographing it to test out some new camera setting idea, which worked really well for a couple of closeups.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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This topic is about the Arthropod Family Asellidae

Cress Bugs are a common invertabrate in PA spring creeks. They are significant food forms for trout where found in abundance.

Example specimens

Leonardo
Leonardo's profile picture
México, D.F

Posts: 9
Leonardo on Mar 28, 2013March 28th, 2013, 9:22 pm EDT
My name is Leonardo García, I am a biologist intern in the National Autonomous University of Mexico and I'm doing my thesis with title "Morphological variation in the genus Caecidotea isopods (Packard, 1871) (Crustacea: Peracarida: Isopoda) of Mexico." Inside the National Collection of Crustacean, Biology Institute (UNAM).

I was wondering if somebody can help me to get some specimens of the specie Caecidotea communis and send them to me to continue with my thesis work. It would help and enrich my study.

Thanks for your attention

Leo
Taxon
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Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Mar 29, 2013March 29th, 2013, 1:25 am EDT
Hi Leo-

I assume you are pursuing an advanced degree in marine biology, as I believe Caecidotea communis to be a marine isopod. As far as I know, folks on this forum would be more likely to be familiar with freshwater isopods.

Maybe I'm missing something here, but wouldn't it have been prudent to made sure you had an adequate source of the critters you were intending to study before embarking on the study? :-)
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Crepuscular
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Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Mar 29, 2013March 29th, 2013, 3:32 am EDT
Rodger, Caecidotea communis is a freshwater isopod. We have it here in PA. Or maybe I'm missing something here...;)
Taxon
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Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Mar 29, 2013March 29th, 2013, 6:51 am EDT
Hi Eric,

Ah, I stand corrected. Thanks for pointing out the error regarding my belief. :-)
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Troutnut
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Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Mar 29, 2013March 29th, 2013, 10:06 am EDT
Leo said I had some of them on my site and asked if I could get him any more from Wisconsin, but since I'm in Alaska I pointed him here to see if anyone else could help.

Leo, if there are photos of that species on this site, can you post a link to their specimen pages so people can see what they're looking for? A description of the identifying characteristics of that species would be helpful, too.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Entoman
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Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Mar 29, 2013March 29th, 2013, 10:22 am EDT
Eric -

This one had me going as well. I've only seen the family name Asellidae when these critters are mentioned in FF literature. I've never run into them in my angling. Is Caecidotea communis the species name of your most common Cress Bug? Do they fill the niche in your SC weedbeds that Gammarus scuds do out here? Are they as photophobic? The only things I know are that they can be abundant in PA, are scavengers, and that they are worth imitating as the fish seem to relish them. Our hatch page on this critter is blank and I'd like to add any info you can provide.

Thanks,
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Entoman
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Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Mar 29, 2013March 29th, 2013, 10:37 am EDT
Ah, we were thinking the same thing, Jason. I moved the topic to the hatch page. My hunch is the PA contingent will be able to help Leo.:)
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Crepuscular
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Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Mar 29, 2013March 29th, 2013, 11:34 am EDT
Honestly I don't have a species key so I can't tell you if what we have is communis. If it is. How many pounds do you want Leo? ;)
Entoman
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Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Mar 29, 2013March 29th, 2013, 11:38 am EDT
:)LOL
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Leonardo
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México, D.F

Posts: 9
Leonardo on Mar 29, 2013March 29th, 2013, 12:22 pm EDT
Thanks for the welcome! =)
Leonardo
Leonardo's profile picture
México, D.F

Posts: 9
Leonardo on Mar 29, 2013March 29th, 2013, 12:50 pm EDT
Hi all!

I'll be happy to provide taxonomic information as well as the biology of the freshwater isopod.
I have some identification keys that are very basic to clearly distinguish them with the help of a pair of microscopes.
I attached a link where you can see the key to Williams (1970) A revision of North American epigean species of Asellus. On pages 4-17 is the description of the species Caecidotea communis (most common in North America). I recommend paying attention to pages 8 and 11 as the palm of the second pleopod gnatopod are heavier characters in taxonomic identification.

This is the link to download the key
http://si-pddr.si.edu/jspui/bitstream/10088/5397/2/SCtZ-0049-Lo_res.pdf

To differentiate between males and females is easy. Pay attention to the palms of the gnatopod, it´s presence is a sexual dimorphism in males. Because this gnatopod is much larger in males (Figure A on page 8, first pereiopod).

Crepuscular, it would very kind of you could help me. I just need at least 20 specimens. Would it be possible to send me these specimens?

Thank you all!

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