Header image
Enter a name
Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Ventral view of a Hydropsyche (Hydropsychidae) (Spotted Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
With a bit of help from the microscope, this specimen keys clearly and unsurprisingly to Hydropsyche.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

This topic is about the Mayfly Family Leptohyphidae

Read about the Tricorythodes genus for details. It is very important to trout anglers and it's the only significant trout stream genus in this family.

Most of the other genera are found only in warm waters in Mexico and the Southwest.

Example specimens

Doublezz105
Posts: 4
Doublezz105 on Oct 29, 2009October 29th, 2009, 10:46 am EDT
I have two keys (Pekarsky et al and Merrit and Cummins) listing Tricorythodes in the tricorythidae family, but Troutnut and Voshell show tricorythodes in the leptohyphidae family. Has tricorythodes been moved to leptohyphidae or vice versa?
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Oct 29, 2009October 29th, 2009, 11:58 am EDT
Doublezz105: I have two keys (Pekarsky et al and Merrit and Cummins) listing Tricorythodes in the tricorythidae family, but Troutnut and Voshell show tricorythodes in the leptohyphidae family. Has tricorythodes been moved to leptohyphidae or vice versa?


I believe acceptance of family Leptohyphidae dates to 2000, as described in Generic Revision of the North and Central American Leptohyphidae (Ephemeroptera: Pannota) by Wiersema and McCafferty.

The publication date of Aquatic Insects Of North America (Third Edition) by Merritt and Cummins is 1997. And, Freshwater macroinvertebrates of Northeastern North America by Pekarsky et al was published in 1990. So, both publications would have still listed genus Tricorythodes under family Tricorythidae.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Konchu
Konchu's profile picture
Site Editor
Indiana

Posts: 498
Konchu on Oct 30, 2009October 30th, 2009, 5:33 am EDT
taxon, check out mccafferty and wang's 2000 paper about pannote mayflies; they should give a history of the family leptohyphidae in there
Doublezz105
Posts: 4
Doublezz105 on Oct 30, 2009October 30th, 2009, 5:46 am EDT
Thanks so much for the speedy responses. And a special thanks for the link to the Wiersema & McCafferty paper. I thought it might be a taxonomy change since the publication of the keys, but I figured I'd check with some experts!

Quick Reply

Related Discussions

Topic
Replies
Last Reply
5
Apr 13, 2007
by Troutnut
8
Sep 3, 2007
by Gene
Troutnut.com is copyright © 2004-2024 (email Jason). privacy policy