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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Grammotaulius betteni (Limnephilidae) (Northern Caddisfly) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This is a striking caddis larva with an interesting color pattern on the head. Here are some characteristics I was able to see under the microscope, but could not easily expose for a picture:
- The prosternal horn is present.
- The mandible is clearly toothed, not formed into a uniform scraper blade.
- The seems to be only 2 major setae on the ventral edge of the hind femur.
- Chloride epithelia seem to be absent from the dorsal side of any abdominal segments.
Based on these characteristics and the ones more easily visible from the pictures, this seems to be Grammotaulius. The key's description of the case is spot-on: "Case cylindrical, made of longitudinally arranged sedge or similar leaves," as is the description of the markings on the head, "Dorsum of head light brownish yellow with numerous discrete, small, dark spots." The spot pattern on the head is a very good match to figure 19.312 of Merritt R.W., Cummins, K.W., and Berg, M.B. (2019). The species ID is based on Grammotaulius betteni being the only species of this genus known in Washington state.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Paul123
Paul Balserak

Posts: 2
Paul123 on Jul 3, 2009July 3rd, 2009, 12:40 pm EDT
In a week I'll be on the Cheat River trying to catch some trout. I'm relatively new to fly fishing, how do I know what the best flies to try are?
Paul Balserak
CaseyP
CaseyP's profile picture
Arlington, VA/ Mercersburg, PA

Posts: 653
CaseyP on Jul 4, 2009July 4th, 2009, 6:57 am EDT
Paul, welcome to the board.

this time of year ants, beetles, and grasshoppers are popular menu items for trout. ants are hard to see, so i tie one on behind a grasshopper. after a while the ant gets wet and sinks and sometimes that makes it better. the tiny flies called tricos are worth a try; they hatch early in the morning on a lot of rivers in July and August.

as far as other hatches, you could do worse than call or visit the nearest fly shop. that old-fashioned advice is getting harder to follow since so many shops have closed, but sometimes you'll find a "web presence" that will compensate.
"You can observe a lot by watching." Yogi Berra
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jul 4, 2009July 4th, 2009, 6:58 am EDT
Paul, find some fly shops near the Cheat, and spend some time talking with the guys there. They'll know what's best for this time of year, and can not only provide you with good flies, they may be able to suggest some good spots to fish. Good luck.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Paul123
Paul Balserak

Posts: 2
Paul123 on Jul 18, 2009July 18th, 2009, 9:02 am EDT
Thanks for the replies to my question! Just got back. I had some good time fishing ... not as much as I'd have liked. Caught a few of what looked like Perch on a micro mayfly. Perhaps best was my 7 yr old caught a fish! He was dancing on the water he was so happy.

Paul
Paul Balserak
DocWet
Erie, PA

Posts: 15
DocWet on Jul 21, 2009July 21st, 2009, 2:26 am EDT
I thought the Cheat River was polluted by mine acid drainage.
My favorite trout stream picture; below, shows what a first class trout river looks like. The lack of stream gradient means that this river is not subject to the roaring scouring floods so common here in PA. that wipe out everything in the river.
DocWet
Erie, PA

Posts: 15
DocWet on Aug 6, 2009August 6th, 2009, 5:13 am EDT
Those are small yellow perch all right. I have talked to others who have caught the same fish. Apparently, there are lots of them.
My favorite trout stream picture; below, shows what a first class trout river looks like. The lack of stream gradient means that this river is not subject to the roaring scouring floods so common here in PA. that wipe out everything in the river.

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