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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Artistic view of a Perlodidae (Springflies and Yellow Stones) Stonefly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
This one seems to lead to Couplet 35 of the Key to Genera of Perlodidae Nymphs and the genus Isoperla, but I'm skeptical that's correct based on the general look. I need to get it under the microscope to review several choices in the key, and it'll probably end up a different Perlodidae.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Calloway has attached this picture to aid in identification. The message is below.
Calloway
Asheville, NC

Posts: 5
Calloway on Mar 11, 2009March 11th, 2009, 2:13 am EDT
Quill Gordon or March Brown
Taxon
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Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Mar 11, 2009March 11th, 2009, 3:40 am EDT
Keith-

I would say neither. I believe the mayfly photo you posted to be of an Ameletus oregonensis male imago. Where and when was the photo taken?
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Calloway
Asheville, NC

Posts: 5
Calloway on Mar 11, 2009March 11th, 2009, 3:41 am EDT
Upstate SC a few days ago
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Mar 11, 2009March 11th, 2009, 5:35 am EDT
Keith-

Well, in that case, it may another species of Ameletus, as I believe distribution of A. oregonensis is limited to the NW. The only Ameletus species I know of in SC is A. cryptostimulus, but unfortunately, I don't have access to a description of it, as it was first recognized in 1978, 43 years after publication of The Biology Of Mayflies, the text I most heavily rely on for mayfly species descriptions.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Troutnut
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Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Mar 11, 2009March 11th, 2009, 10:12 am EDT
None of the above. It's a "pseudo-gray drake," in the genus Siphloplecton. Compare with this one:

http://www.troutnut.com/specimen/253

I don't know how to tell the species apart. Siphloplecton basale seems to be the one most often mentioned in fly fishing books, but based on the distribution maps it seems some other species are more likely for your area.

The size and very early time of year match the Siphloplecton specimens I've collected.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Mar 11, 2009March 11th, 2009, 10:16 am EDT
Keith,

I believe this is Siphloplecton basale. Ameletus would have a sharper costal angulation on the hindwing. The dark areas in the bulla and the stigmatic regions of the forewing and the dark basal 1/3rd of the hindwing are characteristics of S. basale.
Troutnut
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Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Mar 11, 2009March 11th, 2009, 10:20 am EDT
Ooh! I win by 4 minutes! ;)
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Mar 11, 2009March 11th, 2009, 12:10 pm EDT
Ah, and I stand corrected.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Troutnut
Troutnut's profile picture
Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Mar 12, 2009March 12th, 2009, 8:13 pm EDT
Calloway, did you have good fishing to this hatch? When I've seen them, their numbers are always too few to provide any action on their own. They overlapped with the Hendricksons sometimes, though.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Mar 13, 2009March 13th, 2009, 10:32 am EDT
OK, I see Gonzo is coming out of skiing exile. Glad to have you back on. Check your PM's.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell

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