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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Dorsal view of a Grammotaulius betteni (Limnephilidae) (Northern Caddisfly) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This is a striking caddis larva with an interesting color pattern on the head. Here are some characteristics I was able to see under the microscope, but could not easily expose for a picture:
- The prosternal horn is present.
- The mandible is clearly toothed, not formed into a uniform scraper blade.
- The seems to be only 2 major setae on the ventral edge of the hind femur.
- Chloride epithelia seem to be absent from the dorsal side of any abdominal segments.
Based on these characteristics and the ones more easily visible from the pictures, this seems to be Grammotaulius. The key's description of the case is spot-on: "Case cylindrical, made of longitudinally arranged sedge or similar leaves," as is the description of the markings on the head, "Dorsum of head light brownish yellow with numerous discrete, small, dark spots." The spot pattern on the head is a very good match to figure 19.312 of Merritt R.W., Cummins, K.W., and Berg, M.B. (2019). The species ID is based on Grammotaulius betteni being the only species of this genus known in Washington state.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Jjlyon01
SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse

Posts: 71
Jjlyon01 on Nov 19, 2008November 19th, 2008, 6:17 am EST
I am doing a project in my latin class on Mayflies of North America. I must derive the latin names of each species, determine the declension, and case. I am having a hard time finding these names in any latin dictionary. Is there anyone who may have a good resource for me to find this information in?
"I now walk into the wild"
Creno
Grants Pass, OR

Posts: 302
Creno on Nov 19, 2008November 19th, 2008, 7:00 am EST
This may be more than you want:


COMPOSITION OF SCIENTIFIC WORDS
A manual of methods and a lexicon of materials for the practice of logotechnics
ROLAND WILBUR BROWN Geologist, U. S. Geological Survey
Information: Book Title: Composition of Scientific Words: A Manual of Methods and a Lexicon of Materials for the Practice of Logotechnics. Contributors: Roland Wilbur Brown - author. Publisher: Smithsonian Institution Press. Place of Publication: Washington, DC. Publication Year: 1956. Page Number: *.

Creno
Grants Pass, OR

Posts: 302
Creno on Nov 19, 2008November 19th, 2008, 7:15 am EST
another one I like:

Jaeger, Edmund C., 1944. A Source Book of Biological Names and Terms, C.T. Thomas publisher.
Troutnut
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Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Nov 19, 2008November 19th, 2008, 7:23 am EST
Remember that there's a big difference between Latin and Latinized. Lots of scientific names are just English words, or some entomologist's girlfriend's name or something, with Latin suffixes tacked on the end. And some of them (like Isonychia bicolor) don't even seem to be Latinized.

You'll have to pick and choose your species to find good Latin words from your class. There are plenty to choose from, but don't get hung up on any particular name that doesn't seem to be Latin... it probably isn't.

I bet Louis can help. I know he's fluent in at least one dead language. ;)
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Jjlyon01
SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse

Posts: 71
Jjlyon01 on Nov 19, 2008November 19th, 2008, 9:34 am EST
Thank you for the help. I figured that some of the species names weren't in latin.
"I now walk into the wild"
Martinlf
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Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Nov 19, 2008November 19th, 2008, 9:35 am EST
The previous recommendations, which I am not familiar with, may prove to be better references, but early chapters (1-7) of Wheelock's Latin give a clear sense of different declensions that may be useful. Chapter 7 in fact has some tips for common endings in the third declension that may help, though offhand most of the names that come to mind seem simple first declension nominative, such as Drunella cornuta. Roger, what do you think?
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Taxon
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Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Nov 19, 2008November 19th, 2008, 11:17 am EST
Louis-

Roger, what do you think?


In response to your rhetorical question, I shall rely on Mark Twain, who advises, "It is better to keep your mouth closed and let people think you are a fool than to open it and remove all doubt."
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Nov 19, 2008November 19th, 2008, 12:37 pm EST
I knew we'd get a good answer out of our one and only Taxon.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell

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