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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Millcreek has attached these 4 pictures. The message is below.
Taken from Russian River. Dec. 24th, 2015. 25 mm.
Taken from Russian River. Dec. 24th, 2015. 25 mm.
Taken from Russian River. June 17, 2013. 30 mm.
Taken from Russian River. June 17, 2013. 30 mm.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Jun 13, 2016June 13th, 2016, 6:28 pm EDT
These are relatively uncommon in the Russian River. They are more common in its tributaries. Typically they are found in fast glides or riffles.

They can be confused with Pteronarcella or other species of Pteronacys but Pteronarcella have a rounded pronotum and gills on the third abdominal segment while the only other known species of Pteronarcys in the area, Pteronarcys princeps has a less pointed pronotum.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Jmd123
Jmd123's profile picture
Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Jun 13, 2016June 13th, 2016, 8:56 pm EDT
Love these big guys! Not sure if our species is the same, ours are pretty much black, and up to a size 2! And you practically have to dig into a log to find them, they like to crawl into crevices in wood. The adults are pretty impressive too!

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Jun 14, 2016June 14th, 2016, 5:55 am EDT
Jonathon - The species are different, but pretty much similar superficially. As far as habitat goes ours seem to prefer a bottom of large gravel and cobbles. The adults are impressive and pretty poor fliers. They just lumber along.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein

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