Header image
Enter a name
Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Limnephilidae (Giant Sedges) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen resembled several others of around the same size and perhaps the same species, which were pretty common in my February sample from the upper Yakima. Unfortunately, I misplaced the specimen before I could get it under a microscope for a definitive ID.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

This topic is about the Stonefly Family Capniidae

These are the first stoneflies of the year to appear in most parts of the country, and often the first aquatic insects noticed by the angler. Their dark brown or black bodies are easy to spot against the snowbanks where they crawl around.

Capnia in the West and Allocapnia in the East are probably the most common genera of this prolific family.

Example specimens

CaseyP
CaseyP's profile picture
Arlington, VA/ Mercersburg, PA

Posts: 653
CaseyP on Nov 28, 2012November 28th, 2012, 11:55 am EST
in the winter, we here in the east are told that little black stoneflies might be hatching, so we tie up neat little tiny black things to represent the dries. can anyone steer me to a proper pattern for the nymphs? or is any dark quite small generic nymph going to do the job?

and surely they have a sexy Latin name...
"You can observe a lot by watching." Yogi Berra
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Nov 28, 2012November 28th, 2012, 6:44 pm EST
Hi Casey-

and surely they have a sexy Latin name...


Yes, they surely do. Take your choice, as all these are present in VA:

Capniidae Allocapnia aurora Aurora Snowfly
Capniidae Allocapnia curiosa Peculiar Snowfly
Capniidae Allocapnia frisoni Evansville Snowfly
Capniidae Allocapnia fumosa Smokies Snowfly
Capniidae Allocapnia granulata Common Snowfly
Capniidae Allocapnia harperi Stonyfork Snowfly
Capniidae Allocapnia illinoensis (Illinois Snowfly)
Capniidae Allocapnia loshada (Recurved Snowfly)
Capniidae Allocapnia maria (Two-knobbed Snowfly)
Capniidae Allocapnia mystica (Moraine Snowfly)
Capniidae Allocapnia nivicola (Brook Snowfly)
Capniidae Allocapnia pygmaea (Pygmy Snowfly)
Capniidae Allocapnia recta (Eastern Snowfly)
Capniidae Allocapnia rickeri (Midwest Snowfly)
Capniidae Allocapnia simmonsi (Spatulate Snowfly)
Capniidae Allocapnia stannardi (Blueridge Snowfly)
Capniidae Allocapnia virginiana (Virginia Snowfly)
Capniidae Allocapnia vivipara (Shortwing Snowfly)
Capniidae Allocapnia wrayi (Pristine Snowfly)
Capniidae Allocapnia zola (Ash Snowfly)
Capniidae Nemocapnia carolina (Southern Snowfly)
Capniidae Paracapnia angulata (Angulate Snowfly)
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Nov 28, 2012November 28th, 2012, 6:52 pm EST
Kurt-

Is the image at the top of this thread misplaced? It seems incongruous to display an image of Pteronarcys biloba under thread title of Specimen Discussion > little black stoneflies.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Nov 28, 2012November 28th, 2012, 7:52 pm EST
Yes indeed, Roger. Thanks for pointing it out - I'll move it.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
CaseyP
CaseyP's profile picture
Arlington, VA/ Mercersburg, PA

Posts: 653
CaseyP on Nov 29, 2012November 29th, 2012, 3:23 am EST
my fault, Kurt! went looking for stoneflies and found some and just started writing...thanks for setting me straight and finding the appropriate pictures.

looks like some fine brass wire and yellow pheasant tail would make the right kind of Sawyer pattern nymph for these guys. skinny little things, aren't they!
"You can observe a lot by watching." Yogi Berra
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Nov 29, 2012November 29th, 2012, 7:30 am EST
Hey, no sweat Casey. Happens all the time.

looks like some fine brass wire and yellow pheasant tail would make the right kind of Sawyer pattern nymph for these guys. skinny little things, aren't they!

You got that right! I remember the first time I saw them against my kick net, I thought they were midge pupae until looking closer. I think your idea for an imitation is spot on as well. Though their nymphs are usually brown, I've also had good luck with tiny Copper John's tied with black wire during Snowfly season. Perhaps they take them for drowned adults or just silhouette better in slightly turbid water. As you suggest, tie 'em sparse!
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman

Quick Reply

Related Discussions

Topic
Replies
Last Reply
2
Feb 21, 2019
by Creno
0
Feb 20, 2010
by Jim584th
3
Feb 22, 2010
by Jim584th
Troutnut.com is copyright © 2004-2024 (email Jason). privacy policy