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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Lateral view of a Psychodidae True Fly Larva from Mystery Creek #308 in Washington
This wild-looking little thing completely puzzled me. At first I was thinking beetle or month larva, until I got a look at the pictures on the computer screen. I made a couple of incorrect guesses before entomologist Greg Courtney pointed me in the right direction with Psychodidae. He suggested a possible genus of Thornburghiella, but could not rule out some other members of the tribe Pericomini.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

14Adams
Western PA

Posts: 4
14Adams on May 30, 2011May 30th, 2011, 5:01 pm EDT
Howdy all. I have a question about the mayfly I fished among this evening. There were quite a few of them,females I figure,with snow white abdomens. Not just sort of white, snow white. I couldn't catch any for pics as they dipped and rose from the surface. Not huge,not small,just a fairly abundant medium sized mayfly. Any thoughts?
Troutnut
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Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on May 30, 2011May 30th, 2011, 6:18 pm EDT
Like this maybe?

http://www.troutnut.com/specimen/778

The other white-bodied mayflies I can think of are green drake spinners (roughly the right time of year, but they're big) and Ephoron mayflies (right size and color, wrong time of year).
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
14Adams
Western PA

Posts: 4
14Adams on May 31, 2011May 31st, 2011, 5:29 pm EDT
Not exactly. The wings and thorax are darker. I went back this evening looking for a spinner or two to gather up,but no dice. There were a few females dipping again and without a net I didn't stand a chance. Being the first of June I have to think Green Drake. The less than monsterous porportions may just be a local thing.
Troutnut
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Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on May 31, 2011May 31st, 2011, 7:16 pm EDT
Green drakes are the only white-abdomen spinners I can think of with anything other than totally clear wings. Here's one of my green drake spinners:

http://www.troutnut.com/specimen/736

Look about right?
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
14Adams
Western PA

Posts: 4
14Adams on Jun 1, 2011June 1st, 2011, 12:28 pm EDT
Looks like the critter. I figure that's it.
Konchu
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Site Editor
Indiana

Posts: 498
Konchu on Jun 2, 2011June 2nd, 2011, 8:23 pm EDT
There are some medium sized heptageniids that fit the bill, I think, unless I'm way off. Always a possibility these days.

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