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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Holocentropus (Polycentropodidae) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This one seems to tentatively key to Holocentropus, although I can't make out the anal spines in Couplet 7 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae nor the dark bands in Couplet 4 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae, making me wonder if I went wrong somewhere in keying it out. I don't see where that could have happened, though. It might also be that it's a very immature larva and doesn't possess all the identifying characteristics in the key yet. If Holocentropus is correct, then Holocentropus flavus and Holocentropus interruptus are the two likely possibilities based on range, but I was not able to find a description of their larvae.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Grannom
Northwest PA

Posts: 87
Grannom on Jun 24, 2008June 24th, 2008, 10:22 am EDT
I live in NW PA, and have no trout streams near my house, but there is a small stream about a mile away, where I have never seen a bug hatch from. I found a small, size 18-20,light brown(from what my friend said, I'm colorblind)mayfly with two tails. Wings were cloudy with no veination. The body seem rather stalky compared to what I'm used to. Any ideas? I know this is vague, and you bug guru's are gonna hate me.
"Be calm - you're there..." "...Tell yourself there's no rush, even if there is."

-John Gierach
Grannom
Northwest PA

Posts: 87
Grannom on Jun 26, 2008June 26th, 2008, 10:02 am EDT
Gonzo- Stocky
"Be calm - you're there..." "...Tell yourself there's no rush, even if there is."

-John Gierach
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Jun 26, 2008June 26th, 2008, 11:36 am EDT
Thanks, Mike. My first impression was that you had probably found a baetid ("two tails"), but I now think it might be a caenid that had lost one of its tails. These stocky little mayflies have broad forewings and no hindwings. Their wing and body shapes are similar to Tricos. The sparse venation (few cross-veins) would probably be fairly indistinct ("cloudy" wings). You might also have noticed a dark line along the leading edge of the forewing. Although it might have come from the stream you mention, it could also have come from a pond or lake. Does that sound right?
Grannom
Northwest PA

Posts: 87
Grannom on Jun 26, 2008June 26th, 2008, 1:12 pm EDT
Yeah, Gonzo, sounds good. Also, there were no hindwings now that you mention it. But I really have no idea where is came from. The stream is the only body of water near my house. Thanks
"Be calm - you're there..." "...Tell yourself there's no rush, even if there is."

-John Gierach

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