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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Lateral view of a Onocosmoecus (Limnephilidae) (Great Late-Summer Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen keys pretty easily to Onocosmoecus, and it closely resembles a specimen from Alaska which caddis expert Dave Ruiter recognized as this genus. As with that specimen, the only species in the genus documented in this area is Onocosmoecus unicolor, but Dave suggested for that specimen that there might be multiple not-yet-distinguished species under the unicolor umbrella and it would be best to stick with the genus-level ID. I'm doing the same for this one.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Mayfly Genus Attenella

This genus is represented by several important species across the country. In the East, Attenella attenuata (Little Blue-winged Olive) has garnered much attention as an important hatch in past angling texts. However, possible confusion with more abundant Drunella species of Blue-winged Olives has perhaps led to overstatement regarding its importance.

The species Attenella margarita (Little Western Blue-winged Olive) is disributed nationally. Though its eastern presence is relatively minor, in the West this mayfly can produce exceptional hatches.

Two other western species, Attenella delantala and to a lesser extent Attenella soquele often show up quite prominently in stream samples taken in the coastal states. The dramatically marked delantala nymph cannot be easily confused with any other western ephemerellid. Information regarding their winged appearance seems to be unavailable for now. Why they have gone unreported in angling texts is a mystery perhaps due to emergence behavior or misidentification by anglers of the dun and spinner stages. There is much to learn about these species that can be fairly abundant in some locales.

Where & when

In 18 records from GBIF, adults of this genus have been collected during July (56%), June (17%), August (17%), May (6%), and April (6%).

In 6 records from GBIF, this genus has been collected at elevations ranging from 194 to 8350 ft, with an average (median) of 5420 ft.

Genus Range

Hatching behavior

A significant difference between this genus and other ephemerellids is it's reported propensity to emerge from its nymphal shuck from the stream bottom in heptagenid fashion. While other ephemerellids can and do emerge underwater, this usually takes place within a foot at most from the surface. Attenella's availability as a submerged dun in the entire water column means use of the winged wetfly or soft hackles fished deeply can be an important tactic.

Specimens of the Mayfly Genus Attenella

1 Male Dun
3 Female Duns
3 Nymphs

Start a Discussion of Attenella

References

Mayfly Genus Attenella

Genus Range
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