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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Pycnopsyche guttifera (Limnephilidae) (Great Autumn Brown Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen appears to be of the same species as this one collected in the same spot two months earlier. The identification of both is tentative. This one suffered some physical damage before being photographed, too, so the colors aren't totally natural. I was mostly photographing it to test out some new camera setting idea, which worked really well for a couple of closeups.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Mayfly Genus Apobaetis (Tiny Blue-Winged Olives)

This genus contains only one species of any known significance, Apobaetis futilis, a Western hatch. For anglers looking for correlation with older angler entomologies, this hind wingless little mayfly was formerly known as Pseudocloeon futile.

Where & when

In 2 records from GBIF, adults of this genus have been collected during October (100%).

In 2 records from GBIF, this genus has been collected at elevations of 781 and 781 ft.

Genus Range

Discussions of Apobaetis

Possible ID
1 replies
Posted by Sreyadig on Apr 11, 2021 in the species Apobaetis futilis
Last reply on Apr 11, 2021 by Taxon
In searching for nymphs in my small stream in northern Maryland, 500 yards from the PA line, I came across a 2 tailed mayfly that was not a of the Epeorus genus.

It was in a fast riffle section along with Epeorus nymphs. This was about 3/8” in overall length including tails. Darker straw coloration with dark brownish black wing cases that were pronounced in color and shape. Biggest factor was the tails. Median caudal filament was truncated, very small compared to the outer pair. Not even sure if tail/ caudal filament should be used to describe. In my books the closest thing is the Pseudocloeon futile. Which is an old taxonomic name I’m finding out.

This find seems rare in my area and experience. Hopefully I can get a photo...

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Mayfly Genus Apobaetis (Tiny Blue-Winged Olives)

Genus Range
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