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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Skwala (Perlodidae) (Large Springfly) Stonefly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
This Skwala nymph still has a couple months left to go before hatching, but it's still a good representative of its species, which was extremely abundant in my sample for a stonefly of this size. It's obvious why the Yakima is known for its Skwala hatch.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Landscape & scenery photos from the Copper River

The Copper River in Alaska
I like this one.  Glacial river, taiga, tundra, and the perpetual ice cover of a massive high ridge dozens of miles away in the Wrangell Mountains.

From the Copper River in Alaska
The Copper River is another of Alaska's major glacial drainages, hosting huge salmon runs which spread out more thinly into its clearwater tributaries to spawn.  

This panorama is best viewed full-size.

From the Copper River in Alaska
Another panorama of the huge Copper River.

From the Copper River in Alaska
The Copper River in Alaska
This is a pretty cool silhouette of a bald eagle carrying some food, even though it isn't terribly well-focused or well-lit.  I was actually driving when I took it (though it was on a no-traffic campground driveway, so it wasn't unsafe) and the eagle swooped into the roadway right in front of me, then flew around to the side and gave me this profile.

From the Copper River in Alaska
A raven flies over the Copper River.

From the Copper River in Alaska
A raven returns to its cliff-side nest along the Copper River.

From the Copper River in Alaska
The Copper River in Alaska
Here's part of my final catch, though many more fish are hidden in the turbid glacial water.  There are 40 salmon in all.  The limit for a household dipnetting permit is normally 30, but this year the sockeye run greatly exceeded expectations, so the Alaska Department of Fish & Game increased everyone's limit by 10 for several weeks.
Dipnetting to fill the freezer with salmon is not as tidy as catch & release fly fishing.  Here's the process:  1.  Beat the salmon as hard as you can between the eyes with a club, several times if needed, while it's still in the net.  This makes it stop flopping so you can remove it from the net.  2.  Cut the base of the gill arches on one side with scissors, severing major arteries that send blood spurting out of the unconscious fish's body, quickly killing it and assuring ideal flavor.  3.  Thread the stringer in through one of the gills and out the mouth, and stick the fish back in the glacial river to keep cool.  

After whacking ten or fifteen fish in the same spot, the riverbank looks like it warrants a CSI team.

From the Copper River in Alaska
This is the home base for the Chitina dipnetting fishery that supplies thousands of Alaskans with much (if not most) of their annual protein.  Many people pay a jetboat charter to ferry them down to prime spots in the canyon, and ferry their hundreds of pounds of fish back up.  Others follow the trail to which this bridge leads and negotiate the steep canyon wall themselves, with their fish, and haul them back with the help of an ATV.

From the Copper River in Alaska
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