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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Dorsal view of a Epeorus albertae (Heptageniidae) (Pink Lady) Mayfly Nymph from the East Fork Issaquah Creek in Washington
This specimen keys to the Epeorus albertae group of species. Of the five species in that group, the two known in Washington state are Epeorus albertae and Epeorus dulciana. Of the two, albertae has been collected in vastly more locations in Washington than dulciana, suggesting it is far more common. On that basis alone I'm tentatively putting this nymph in albertae, with the large caveat that there's no real information to rule out dulciana.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Landscape & scenery photos from the Chena River

Angel Rocks in smoke

From the Chena River in Alaska
The Chena River in Alaska
What a great place for a fly line to be!

From the Chena River in Alaska
The Chena River in Alaska
The Chena River in Alaska
This old grayling had some serious battle scars on its dorsal fin, something I've never seen before catching many hundreds of fish.
The Chena River in Alaska
The Chena River in Alaska
The Chena River in Alaska
This nice grayling (about 17 inches) was the lone resident of a deep, practically still-water pool in a low-flow side channel of the upper river. 

I coaxed it out with a risky sidearm cast into a narrow window under some low-hanging brush, a feat about which I must brag to make myself feel better about my next several attempts at impressive casts, all of which resulted in wading across the river and spoiling the pool to retrieve the fly from a tree.
The Chena River in Alaska
The Chena River in Alaska
My wife's first Arctic grayling... beautiful!  And so is the fish.
The Chena River in Alaska
Flies and fly tying materials converge on a moose's butt.

From the Chena River in Alaska
My wife plays her first grayling.

From the Chena River in Alaska
This pretty little grayling fell for a well-placed beetle imitation.
One of the most common sights on Chena Hot Springs Road is a moose crossing the road.  The next most common sight is somebody taking a picture of the moose crossing the road.

From the Chena River in Alaska
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