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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Grammotaulius betteni (Limnephilidae) (Northern Caddisfly) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This is a striking caddis larva with an interesting color pattern on the head. Here are some characteristics I was able to see under the microscope, but could not easily expose for a picture:
- The prosternal horn is present.
- The mandible is clearly toothed, not formed into a uniform scraper blade.
- The seems to be only 2 major setae on the ventral edge of the hind femur.
- Chloride epithelia seem to be absent from the dorsal side of any abdominal segments.
Based on these characteristics and the ones more easily visible from the pictures, this seems to be Grammotaulius. The key's description of the case is spot-on: "Case cylindrical, made of longitudinally arranged sedge or similar leaves," as is the description of the markings on the head, "Dorsum of head light brownish yellow with numerous discrete, small, dark spots." The spot pattern on the head is a very good match to figure 19.312 of Merritt R.W., Cummins, K.W., and Berg, M.B. (2019). The species ID is based on Grammotaulius betteni being the only species of this genus known in Washington state.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Landscape & scenery photos from Clearwater Mountains

Morning caribou 2

From Clearwater Mountains in Alaska
Clearwater Mountains in Alaska
Rainbow over upper Alpine Creek

From Clearwater Mountains in Alaska
Clearwater Mountains in Alaska
Clearwater Mountains in Alaska
Lake atop Alpine Creek

From Clearwater Mountains in Alaska
Dragonwort (Persicaria bistorta)

From Clearwater Mountains in Alaska
Caribou backbone. The sawed-off ribs on this partial caribou skeleton mean it was killed by a hunter. Given the location, it might be my bull from last year. It's nice to see how quickly the tundra animals made use of everything that remained.

From Clearwater Mountains in Alaska
Clearwater Mountains in Alaska
Clearwater Mountains in Alaska
Denali Highway

From Clearwater Mountains in Alaska
Clearwater Mountains in Alaska
Clearwater Mountains in Alaska
Jason's 2013 Caribou. (Gross caption warning! read no further if easily disgusted!) The goo coming out the nose and mouth was a result of a very unusual bullet hit that scrambled the trachea/esophagus and left stomach contents oozing out the respiratory tract. The same shot clipped the top of the heart for an instant kill. This animal was not traditionally "gut-shot" at all, though, and I was able to keep all the meat untainted.

From Clearwater Mountains in Alaska
Mountain north of Windy Creek

From Clearwater Mountains in Alaska
Windy Creek Road

From Clearwater Mountains in Alaska
First haul of meat. After getting the meat back to the road, I stashed the hind quarters and burger/rib meat bag in an alder thicket. I took these two front quarters and tenderloins/backstraps out with me on an after-dark bike ride 3 miles downhill to the car. My awesome 172-lumen ZebraLight H51W headlamp lit up the trail almost like a car headlight for me and Lena to make the ride.

From Clearwater Mountains in Alaska
Riding out

From Clearwater Mountains in Alaska

References

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