Header image
Enter a name
Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Ventral view of a Hydropsyche (Hydropsychidae) (Spotted Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
With a bit of help from the microscope, this specimen keys clearly and unsurprisingly to Hydropsyche.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Lateral view of a Female Neophylax (Thremmatidae) (Autumn Mottled Sedge) Caddisfly Adult from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
This large caddisfly looks really neat close-up.
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Oct 4, 2006October 4th, 2006, 1:53 pm EDT
Jason-

Looks like Hydrospyche to me, most likely H. betteni. However, if you've keyed it out to Phryganeidae, I'm probably wrong.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Oct 5, 2006October 5th, 2006, 8:02 am EDT
My first impression was that the wing didn't have quite the degree of recurve typical of Hydropsyche. The photo of the maxillary palp seems conclusive in ruling out this genus (the fifth segment would be much longer in Hydropsyche).

The pattern of spurs on the legs seems to follow Limnephilidae (1, 2-3, 4) rather than Phryganeidae (2, 4, 4); and the five-segmented palp would be female (in either family). Size, color, habitat, and season all seem to suggest Limnephilus (Summer Flier Sedge) as the likely genus to me; but the Limnephilidae are known as an "unruly" family, and some caddisflies just confuse the hell out of me.

Quick Reply

Related Discussions

Topic
Replies
Last Reply
8
Mar 19, 2007
by DMM
Troutnut.com is copyright © 2004-2024 (email Jason). privacy policy