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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Neoleptophlebia (Leptophlebiidae) Mayfly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
Some characteristics from the microscope images for the tentative species id: The postero-lateral projections are found only on segment 9, not segment 8. Based on the key in Jacobus et al. (2014), it appears to key to Neoleptophlebia adoptiva or Neoleptophlebia heteronea, same as this specimen with pretty different abdominal markings. However, distinguishing between those calls for comparing the lengths of the second and third segment of the labial palp, and this one (like the other one) only seems to have two segments. So I'm stuck on them both. It's likely that the fact that they're immature nymphs stymies identification in some important way.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Cheumatopsyche (Little Sister Sedge) Caddisfly Pupa Pictures

I was surprised how bright green this pupa is. It's chartreuse. After collecting it, I experimented with melting down chartreuse jigs and making little translucent rubber caddis abdomens on my flies. They looked good, and the trout liked them, but they weren't very durable at all. This specimen is recently deceased in the photographs.

This caddisfly was collected from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin on May 18th, 2004 and added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on January 25th, 2006.

Discussions of this Pupa

Identification: Cheumatopsyche
Posted by Litobrancha on Sep 23, 2006
Last reply on Sep 23, 2006 by Litobrancha
This is cheumatopsyche female. note at the posterior end of the abdomen the two semi-rectangular plates that are distinct to the base, that is a good diagnostic for cheumatopsyche.

[edited by Troutnut: added title]

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References

Cheumatopsyche (Little Sister Sedge) Caddisfly Pupa Pictures

Collection details
Location: Namekagon River, Wisconsin
Date: May 18th, 2004
Added to site: January 25th, 2006
Author: Troutnut
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