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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Holocentropus (Polycentropodidae) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This one seems to tentatively key to Holocentropus, although I can't make out the anal spines in Couplet 7 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae nor the dark bands in Couplet 4 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae, making me wonder if I went wrong somewhere in keying it out. I don't see where that could have happened, though. It might also be that it's a very immature larva and doesn't possess all the identifying characteristics in the key yet. If Holocentropus is correct, then Holocentropus flavus and Holocentropus interruptus are the two likely possibilities based on range, but I was not able to find a description of their larvae.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Taxon's blog & contributions

Taxon's blog & contributions

About Taxon (Roger Rohrbeck): My interest in identification of aquatic insects developed as a natural byproduct of transitioning from other methods of fishing to fly fishing during my early 40�s. However, it was not until my retirement, which followed a 35-year career in information technology, that I was afforded the opportunity to fully pursue study of aquatic entomology and taxonomy.

Within several years following retirement, I had accumulated an enormity of texts and notes on aquatic entomology and taxonomy. And, it was becoming readily apparent that some manner of organizing and accessing that information was sorely needed, as accurate memory of minutia was definitely not my strong suit.

My initial approach was to organize all the information in an Access database, but it didn�t take long to realize that this approach (alone) would not allow sharing the information with other flyfishers. So, I developed a website, which was initially just many entomology-related pages on the website of the flyfishing club to which I belonged. However, as my ever-increasing need for storage began to cause a problem, I took the big plunge, and got my own domain name and hosting provider. To date my website has received in excess of (300,000) separate visits, from (125) countries, representing all (6) inhabited continents.
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